Tag Archives: connections

New Dialogue Moves in Action: How Out of Eden Learn students use POV, Challenge, and Name tools

This post was co-authored by Susie Blair and Carrie James. We recently announced the expansion of Out of Eden Learn’s online Dialogue Toolkit to include three new dialogue tools: POV, Challenge, and Name. The impetus behind these new tools is to support students to practice dialogue strategies that can deepen their conversations and, in turn, […]

Bridging Divides? Some Reflections on a Recent Symposium at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

What do meaningful cross-cultural engagement and interaction look like? And what might be some of the limitations or unintended consequences, as well as some of the promises, of cross-cultural digital exchange programs? These were the two central questions addressed at “Bridging divides? The promises and limitations of cross-cultural digital exchange programs,” […]

Stories of Human Migration: The potential for students to learn about the world, themselves, and perspectives on the past?

Emi Kane and Sarah Sheya, who have done a great deal of work on this curriculum, contributed to the ideas in this post. Nathalie Popa also contributed. Approximately 1000 teenage students from varied geographic locations and family backgrounds are currently participating in our Stories of Human Migration curriculum, a learning journey that addresses a timely […]

Everyday Borders

We are excited to share what we believe to be an important addition to the Out of Eden Learn curricula: our new Stories of Human Migration learning journey, which we are offering to students aged 13 years and up starting this September and October. This curriculum will continue to be refined and developed in light […]

Exploring Dialogue on OOEL, Part 2: Notice, Connect, Extend, and Snip

In my last post about the Dialogue Toolkit, I reviewed the purpose of our toolkit and described two core moves – Appreciate and Probe – with examples from student work.  To reiterate, the aim of the Dialogue Toolkit (co-developed with Chris Sloan) is to promote thoughtful, mindful exchanges between young people participating in Out of […]

Finding a Deeper Purpose in the Classroom Through Out of Eden Learn

Hollis Scott is a 5th grade teacher at Montair Elementary School in Danville, California. Her students participated in Out of Eden Learn last year. I am a fifth grade teacher in the suburbs of the San Francisco Bay Area. I came to teaching after having worked in the corporate banking world, as a startup representative […]

The story of young Greek travelers in Out of Eden Learn

Kiriaki Melliou is kindergarten specialist at the Directorate of Primary Education in Piraeus and PhD Candidate in the Department of Early Childhood Education of the University of Western Macedonia, Greece. Our story begins at the International Visible Thinking Conference in Miami, Florida, where Shari Tishman presents “Out of Eden Learn” – an online community in […]

Looking slowly at student work together

A former high school Economics teacher and education policymaker from Singapore, Jolyn Chua recently completed her Masters in Education (Mind, Brain and Education) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She has been attending Out of Eden Learn team meetings. “The first picture is a picture of a water supplier that runs around India. In […]

Exploring Dialogue on Out of Eden Learn, Part 1: Appreciate and Probe

Out of Eden Learn (OOEL) is designed around three core learning goals. Across the different “footsteps” (activities) in our curriculum, we emphasize: slowing down and closely observing the world; exchanging stories/careful listening to the stories of others; and exploring how individual lives connect to the lives of others. In developing an online community where students share their […]

Paul’s Responses to Student Work

This post is designed to highlight – and share – some of Paul’s responses to student work produced within Out of Eden Learn. Given Paul’s limited availability, we periodically put together a package of student work for him to comment on; individual students then receive a reply from Paul, which other students in their walking […]